Economic policy

This section reports on economic policy initiatives of the Czech government, the EU, and other entities that have a direct impact on the competitiveness of the country. It also includes information on economic priorities of the AmCham and other leading associations.

Spotlight issue

12th September 2018 / Economic policy / Employment and Social Affairs


AmCham CZ Workforce Report: Manufacturing: National Employment and Median Wages by Occupation 2011-2017 - analysis

The American Chamber of Commerce in the Czech Republic prepared an update on the workforce in the Czech manufacturing sector. This report focuses on main trends in employment and median wages in six occupational categories (managers, professionals, technicians, clerical workforce, craftsmen and plant, machine operators and assemblers) in the private sector at the national level.
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11th October 2018 / Economic policy / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


Czech inflation unexpectedly slows

CPI decelerated to 2.3% in September due to falling prices for package holidays and newly-introduced bus and rail fare discounts for pensioners and students across the country. This is no game changer for the central bank, which we expect to hike rates in November CPI decelerated to 2.3% in September due to falling prices for package holidays and newly-introduced bus and rail fare discounts for pensioners and students across the country. This is no game changer for the central bank, which we expect to hike rates in November 
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4th October 2018 / Economic policy / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


Czech manufacturing PMI at two-year low

The September manufacturing PMI declined further to 53.4, hitting the lowest level in the past two years. Still, this is in line with expectations that Czech industry growth will slow down towards 3% this year
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1st October 2018 / Economic policy / Tax & Finance


IMF: International Corporate Tax Avoidance: A Review of the Channels, Magnitudes, and Blind Spots: A 1 percentage point larger tax rate differential reduces reported pre-tax profits of an affiliate by 1 percent.

According to a recent IMF working paper on tax avoidance, called International Corporate Tax Avoidance: A Review of the Channels, Magnitudes, and Blind Spots, a 1 percentage point larger tax rate differential reduces reported pre-tax profits of an affiliate by 1 percent. The authors believe that this estimate is larger than the consensus so far and the semi-elasticity has increased over time; a value of around 1.5 applies to the most recent years.
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Members of the American Chamber of Commerce in the Czech Republic