Economic policy / Trade and Investment

This section reports on economic policy initiatives of the Czech government, the EU, and other entities that have a direct impact on the competitiveness of the country. It also includes information on economic priorities of the AmCham and other leading associations.

Spotlight issue

14th May 2018 / Economic policy / Trade and Investment


Eurostat: Ratio of investment to GDP highest in the Czech Republic | M.Skorepa, Ceska sporitelna: "We are probably observing a natural fall in the tempo of catching up, in terms of the stock of capital, to richer economies."

Among the EU Member States, in 2017 investment accounted for a quarter of GDP in the Czech Republic (25.2%) and Sweden (24.9%). Estonia (23.7%), Austria (23.5%), Ireland (23.4%), Belgium (23.3%), Romania and Finland (both 22.6%) as well as France (22.4%) all had investment rates of over 20% of GDP, according to Eurostat.
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23rd April 2018 / Economic policy / Trade and Investment


Modern Economic Diplomacy newsletter

The newest issue of Modern Economic Diplomacy, a newsletter published by the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs, includes an interview with Jim Schellinger, the Secretary of Commerce for the state of Indiana.
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23rd March 2018 / Economic policy / Trade and Investment


vbw: The importance of the German economy for Europe - study

Germany is criticized for its high current account surpluses: the export successes of the German economy were at the expense of the other EU states. Our study shows that this criticism is completely unjustified. On the contrary, a strong German economy creates added value and employment in Europe.
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12th March 2018 / Economic policy / Trade and Investment


Weston Stacey: A lot of people in America have underestimated Trump

An article of E15 published on March 12 on steel and aluminum tarrifs (in Czech language). Last Thursday, the Trump administration announced its plan to place tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. The tariffs are intended to raise the production in US steel and aluminum plants to 80%, which is considered the minimum output necessary for survival. If the tariffs take effect, the EU has declared it will place reciprocal tariffs on US products of similar export value. The issue underneath the tariff decision- global overcapacity- is real, but imposing global tariffs does not appear to help solve the problem. An internationally coordinated response using targeted tariffs or quotas might be the best way to keep the economic and geopolitical damage to the minimum.  
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Members of the American Chamber of Commerce in the Czech Republic