Competitiveness / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth

This section feature research, opinion and progress reports on how the Czech Republic compares to other EU countries economically. It includes analysis of international rankings such as the WEF and World Bank.

Spotlight issue

29th September 2016 / Competitiveness / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


WEF Global Competitiveness Index: Czech Republic remains 31st most competitive economy, should improve skills of future workforce

The Czech Republic ranks 31st in the Global Competitiveness Report 2016–2017 ranking, the same result as in the 2015-2016 ranking (although the country's scores were 4.72 and 4.69 in 2016 and 2015, respectively). The report assesses the competitiveness landscape of 138 economies, providing insight into the drivers of their productivity and prosperity.
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21st March 2017 / Competitiveness / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


OECD Reform Agenda for 2017: Czech Republic: Convergence of income and productivity levels have recently resumed

OECD issued Economic Policy Reforms: Going for Growth report that reviews progress in structural reforms in areas related to Going for Growth policy recommendations over the period 2015-16.  
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13th November 2016 / Competitiveness / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


Aspen Institute Prague/Forbes: Czech Republic: The Shape We're In - study, conference (updated)

Together with Forbes Czech Republic, Aspen Institute Prague organized the second edition of the conference, which aims to provide a complex overview of the political, economic and social development of the Czech Republic in a long-term perspective. They focused on the following areas: Economic Potential, Quality of Life, National Security, Education and Governance.
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30th June 2016 / Competitiveness / Macroeconomic Indicators, Economic Growth


IMF: Germany needs reforms

Germany, a champion of structural reform prescriptions within the European Union, needs a large dose of the same medicine at home, too. Beyond public investment in transport and telecommunications, and more competition in services, dealing with an aging population needs urgent attention. With the right policies, Germany can bring more people into the workforce—and for longer—to counter the demographic trend, argues a recent study accompanying the regular health check of the German economy by the International Monetary Fund.  
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Members of the American Chamber of Commerce in the Czech Republic